Ask not for whom the bell tolls.

This is a misquotation of a line by John Donne.

File:JohnDonne.jpg
John Donne (Photo credit Wikipedia)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:JohnDonne.jpg

Any man’s death diminishes me, because I am involved with Mankind;
And therefore never send to know for whom the bell tolls;
It tolls for thee.

It refers to the ringing of a church bell at a funeral.

Over the hill is an expression meaning past one’s peak.

As old as the hills means very old.  Geological ages are very big numbers.

Beyond repair can’t be mended.

Past its best can refer to food or clothing or any object, which deteriorates with time.  People can be past their best too.

Gone to seed has a similar meaning.  The only time I tried to grow vegetables the weather was unusual – I think it was a drought – and the vegetables flowered and went to seed instead of producing carrots and cauliflowers.

You’re as old as you feel is a popular expression.  It can vary from day to day!

“I’m as old as my tongue and a little bit older than my teeth,” is a polite way of refusing to tell someone your actual age.  It used to be considered very bad manners to ask a lady her age.

“That dates me,” is sometimes said when the conversation is about pop songs from decades ago and the speaker remembers them.

The habit of a lifetime could just be the order in which someone makes all the essential preparations for facing the world each day.  At school our headmistress used to read a piece each year about how our habits form our character.

A last fling might be some enjoyable, expensive activity undertaken by someone who is aware that they haven’t long to live.

Pensioned off refers to not doing paid work due to old age or illness.

Put out to grass is what is done with old horses and is sometimes used as a metaphor.

Racehorses which are past their best are put out to stud in the hope of producing winners.

Living on borrowed time is an expression about someone, who has lived longer than they were expected to.

Old age creeps on was a favourite expression of a lady I knew.  She was using it in her late fifties, at a guess, and lived to be over ninety!

Give up the ghost is an expression for dying.  Sometimes it is used about objects which have become useless.  In the King James Bible Jesus “yielded up the ghost.” Matthew  Chapter 27 verse 50.  Ghost is another word for spirit, which means breath.  In the Acts of the Apostles Stephen “fell asleep“. (Acts Chapter 7 verse 60)

A curtain call in the theatre is when the actors and actresses return to make a bow.  Even the ones who have died in the play are there!  It can also mean the end.

Come to a full stop.
A full stop is a punctuation mark also known as a period.  It marks the end of a sentence.  It can also mean cease.

A good innings comes from the game of cricket and can also mean a long life.

Hit the buffers.
Hopefully trains will not do this, but it can also mean come to the end of the track and is yet another euphemism for death.

Go west is slang for be killed or wrecked.

“Let the dead bury their dead” is a quotation from Jesus words in Matthew Chapter 9 verse 22 (KJV)

John Donne wrote a sonnet which begins

Death be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for, thou art not so, 

and ends

One short sleep past, we wake eternally,
And death shall be no more; death, thou shalt die.