My next two archive posts are about speech and hope.  Interestingly, although there are very many phrases and sayings about speech or used in speech, I did not return to this topic for about 18 months.

Pointed remarks: Speaking terms (Part 8)

Ever hopeful

Comments are closed on my early posts.  Any comments should be left here, please and I’ll respond to them as soon as I am able.

The Blogging from A to Z  in April Challenge continues.  My A to Z posts are on Sue’s Trifles.

I would maintain that thanks are the highest form of thought and that gratitude is happiness doubled by wonder.

This quotation is from G. K. Chesterton’s A Short History of England.

Stilted describes rather stiff, formal language. As stilts are wooden posts to lift people or buildings above the ground, I imagine that stilted language is perhaps trying a bit too hard as if standing on tiptoe.

To gloss over something is to avoid going into detail or explain away. Gloss paint is shiny. The gloss in the expression derives from the Latin, glossa, meaning tongue.  The expression He could talk his way out of anything, springs to mind.  Perhaps this is a form of spin – to use a term, which has recently become fashionable.

What it boils down to is… introduces a metaphor for the central issue after all the waffle has been disregarded. When water is boiled dry a sediment of the previously dissolved mineral is left behind.

The long and short of it is . . . can be used in a similar context to the phrase above. Here the idea is whichever way you look at it…

Many a true word is spoken in jest.
This is a well-known saying. It works in two ways. Sometimes someone uses humour to convey an idea, but someone making a joke may unwittingly hit on the truth.

Spouting rubbish is talking nonsense. Spouting means gushing or flowing. Gushing is associated with a particular style of verbosity.

You don’t know when to stop!
This may apply to words or deeds.

This has gone far enough.
A useful phrase for reducing bad behaviour or spreading silly gossip.

Common parlance is a fancy way of saying everyday speech.

His bark is worse than his bite.
Someone who sounds fierce or make threats may not carry them out. The reference to dogs goes without saying.

There’s a tale behind it – nowadays we talk about back-stories. The expression may be the introduction to a long explanation.

That puts a different complexion on it. The speaker has been persuaded that a situation is different from their original impression. Complexion is usually used about the colour of someone’s face.

They’ve no notion – notion means idea.

Never let it be said… …introduces a scenario that the speaker does not wish to be spread as if it were true.

He’s got the cheek of the devil!
The devil uses lies and false promises to try to stop people doing what is right and to tempt us to do what is wrong. He has no scruples.

For my Bible reference today, I am returning to the opening quotation.

Psalm 136 is a wonderful example of the psalmist’s gratitude and thanksgiving to God.

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